The Role of Indigenous Peoples in Armed Forces: Canadian and International Perspectives

  • Jean-François Savard École nationale d'administration publiquey
  • P. Whitney Lackenbauer Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in the Study of the Canadian North and a Professor in the School for the Study of Canada at Trent University

Abstract

This special issue contains articles and research notes authored by scholars from Canada, the United States, Asia-Pacific, and Europe on the roles of Indigenous people in armed forces. The contributors’ explorations of varied forms of military service by Indigenous people(s), political and cultural challenges that Indigenous personnel faced, and sacrifices made in Canada and in other countries, encourages further dialogue on how Indigenous service can be rooted in trustful relationships and how respect for Indigenous cultures, values, and knowledge can inform defence policy and practice.

Author Biographies

Jean-François Savard, École nationale d'administration publiquey
Jean-François Savard holds a PhD in political science from Carleton University and has been a professor at ENAP (École nationale d'administration publique) since 2006, where he teaches analysis and the design and implementation of public policy. His research focuses on Aboriginal policy issues, with a particular focus on Aboriginal self-government, relations between Aboriginal communities and the public administrations of Quebec and Canada, and federalism. Dr. Savard has also led the development of credited graduate programs in public administration offered in Aboriginal communities, with the goal of fostering the autonomy of these communities
P. Whitney Lackenbauer, Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in the Study of the Canadian North and a Professor in the School for the Study of Canada at Trent University

P. Whitney Lackenbauer, Ph.D., is the Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in the Study of the Canadian North and a Professor in the School for the Study of Canada at Trent University, and co-director of the Centre on Foreign Policy and Federalism at St. Jerome’s University in the University of Waterloo. His previous books include The Canadian Rangers: A Living History (2013), A Commemorative History of Aboriginal People in the Canadian Military (co-authored 2010), and Battle Grounds: The Canadian Military and Aboriginal Lands (2007).

Published
2019-02-01
Section
Articles