The Role of Authentic Assessment Tasks in Problem-Based Learning

  • Kim Koh University of Calgary
  • Nadia Delanoy University of Calgary
  • Christy Thomas University of Calgary
  • Rose Bene University of Calgary
  • Olive Chapman University of Calgary
  • Jeff Turner University of Calgary
  • Gail Danysk University of Calgary
  • Gabrielle Hone University of Calgary
Keywords: Authentic Assessment Tasks, Problem-Based Learning

Abstract

Problem-based Learning (PBL) has long been touted as an effective pedagogical approach in higher education to promote students’ authentic learning. As a learner-centered pedagogy, PBL is characterized by students working collaboratively in small groups to solve messy, ill-structured problems that mirror real-world problems encountered by expert professionals in the field. Students are also expected to engage in self-directed learning. PBL instructors play a pivotal role as facilitators of learning. Authentic assessment is deemed to be a viable method in PBL-oriented courses because of its focus on real-world problems. However, little is known about how instructors in higher education institutions perceive the importance of and their satisfaction in using authentic assessment in PBL-oriented courses. Specifically, what instructional decisions do they make to guide their students to use authentic assessment tasks to promote assessment for learning and assessment as learning? In this paper, we reported on instructors’ perspectives of using authentic assessment tasks to engage first-year student teachers in an assessment course.

 

Author Biographies

Kim Koh, University of Calgary
Kim Koh is a Professor at the Werklund School of Education.
Nadia Delanoy, University of Calgary
Nadia Delanoy is an instructor at the Werklund School of Education.
Christy Thomas, University of Calgary

Christy Thomas is an Instructor at Werklund School of Education.

Rose Bene, University of Calgary
Rose Bene is an instructor at the Werklund School of Education.
Olive Chapman, University of Calgary
Olive Chapman is a Professor at the Werklund School of Education.
Jeff Turner, University of Calgary
Jeff Turner is an instructor at the Werklund School of Education
Gail Danysk, University of Calgary
Gail Danysk is an instructor at the Werklund School of Education.
Gabrielle Hone, University of Calgary
Gabrielle Hone is an instructor at the Werklund School of Education.

References

Barrows, H., & Tamblyn, R. (1980). Problem-based learning: An approach to Medical Education. New York: Springer.

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Koh, K. (2014). Developing preservice teachers’ assessment literacy: A problem-

based learning approach. In P. Preciado Babb (Ed.), Proceedings of the IDEAS Rising to the Challenge (pp. 113−120). Calgary, AB: Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary.

Koh, K., & Tan, C. (2016). Promoting reflection in pre-service teachers through problem-based learning: An example from Canada. Reflective Practice. 17(3), 347−356.

Newman, M. (2004). Problem based learning: An introduction and overview of the key features of the approach. Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, 32(1), 12−20.

Pilgrim, M. E. (2014). Engaging future teachers in problem-based learning with the Park City Mathematics Institute problems. Problems, Resources, and Issues in Mathematics Undergraduate Studies, 24(3), 215−231.

Wood, D. F. (2003). ABC of learning and teaching in medicine: Problem based learning. BMJ, 326, 328-330.

Published
2019-04-04
Section
Conference Theme: Students as Creators